Track Changes

The Chronoven interface for WordPress was designed by Robert Tey, for his Masters research at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (around 2008). Supervisor Dr Simon Pockley.

The Chronoven interface for WordPress was designed by Robert Tey, for his Masters research at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (around 2008). Supervisor Dr Simon Pockley.

 

Dear Lisa

I like your idea of extending your previous research into something new, rather than going over the same ground. You might consider rethinking your research question to make it more compelling, constructive, and less woolly.

Alarms should be ringing when you write tautological fluff ‘…as research participants we expand our individual practices which in turn feed back into expanding the collective knowledge system.’

Maybe it’s worth articulating why you think conversations between scientists and artists are important? What flows from these conversations? Is it lack of understanding of climate change that is the problem, or is it lack of action or political will? My understanding is that after more than 30 years of dire warnings by scientists, it is now too late for preventive action and we face either disruptive geo-engineering solutions or adaption.

How about starting with what you mean by ‘Track Changes’? What changes? How and why are these changes tracked and for whom?

Are you doing another Doctorate?

Best wishes

Simon

From: Lisa Roberts To: Simon Pockley
Cc: lisaroberts49@gmail.com
Subject: Re: questions
Date: Tue, 22 Sep 2015 10:25:08 +1000

Dear Simon,

Opening your Email I expected to be challenged! Thank you.

Yes, that IS tautology – circular thinking. I see that now. Thanks for validating my woolly feeling about that.

No I am not doing another Doctorate. I’m simply inspired by conversations I have with scientists and other artists that I record and disseminate as a way to think differently about what I do. Also I’m inspired by Email conversations I’m having with a movement analyst who trained as a geologist. Her observations and writing skills impress me for their cool analysis. There’s nothing woolly there.

I agree that it’s too late to mitigate global warming. However it’s not too late for people with different beliefs to come together to face actuality in the hope of contributing something that can guide us in how to best allocate diminishing resources.

For me personally its about maintaining and building positive
connections between people and places.

Another motivation is the closer relationship I have now with Shawn Wilson, the Indigenous Canadian scholar. We seem to have a sense that our connection is important.

I’m attaching the latest piece Shawn has sent, which is about
conversations.

Thanks for the chance to think and write further!

Best wishes,
Lisa

****

Research Outline (Tuesday Sept 22 2015)

Track changes:
Can conversations between scientists and artists expand understanding of climate change?

Track Changes is independent research facilitated through the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) with supervision from Professor William Gladstone, Head of the School of Life Sciences.

Changes in gestures performed by scientists and artists in conversation over time are identified, that signify new insights into climate change. By gesture I mean a form of expression that defies verbal explanation, and that involves physical movement (signalling, drawing, making, sounding, dancing, photographing, filming, animating etc.). The research is participatory and practice-based; my role is both researcher and practising artist. The experimental design is expanding and circular; as research participants we expand our individual practices which in turn feed back into expanding the collective knowledge system.

Outcomes:
Presentations within and beyond the UTS precinct
Academic and mainstream publications
An evolving online archive of research processes, conversations and presentations

Participants are encouraged to independently exhibit their work resulting from the research, to further public reach and impact of this collective effort. Key outcomes that relate ocean science to human and environmental health will be presented at the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) for the 2018 Southern Ocean Knowledge and Information (SOKI) conference.

Quantitative and qualitative research methods:

A Chronoven interfacewill be adapted to display and to quantify changes recorded in gestures over time.
Visual and written reflections on changes in understandings will be presented in an online journal.

Screenshot from Antarctic Animation (2010)
Chronoven interface designed by Robert Tey
for PhD research by Lisa Roberts

Animation is the primary gestural form I use for exploring changes I experience and observe. Drawings, objects and installations are made as part of the investigative process.

Categories for the Track Changes Chronoven will be named according to changes identified in use of space, time and energy in research participants. I anticipate new and unexpected understandings will arise from conversations between us and that new categories will be recognised and shared through that experience.

The Chronoven interface worked in Antarctic Animationfor tracking changes in my understanding of how animation can be used to combine scientific data and subjective responses. The biggest challenge I found was naming categories for assigning meanings to non-verbal expressions. I changed and added categories as my understanding expanded. As scientist Andrea Leighsays, “Research is a messy business”. I believe this is true of art and science.

Antarctic Animation was a practice-based PhD approached more as free-form than scientific study.

Track Changes combines artistic and scientific approaches to understanding.

About Lisa Roberts

Project leader
This entry was posted in Track changes. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.